Cyber Virus brings down your NHS (and how to avoid that in community pharmacy)

Are you doing enough to safeguard your cyber security?

You can’t fail to have noticed the May 12 WannaCry cyber-attack. It wasn’t pretty.  The IT systems of 17 NHS Trusts and a number of GP surgeries were affected. The health service relies heavily on IT, and without IT it’s only limping along. BBC News stressed the NHS aspect, but many other organisations around the world were infected. The virus didn’t target the NHS. The virus was indiscriminate, not that that helped the NHS. Operations were delayed. Departments were closed. Patients were adversely affected. So what happened? Did you see Horizon on the BBC? Dr Kevin Fong explained it well. It appears that the NSA developed a virus called a worm that is not only able to infect a computer, but then goes on to infect other computers on the local network. Microsoft became aware of the worm and wrote a Windows update that protected computers from this virus. However, not every user applied the update so many computers remained vulnerable. Hackers combined that virus with another crypto-virus, that when it infects a computer, encrypts files on the computer and demands a ransom to unencrypt them. The result was the WannaCry virus.  For those that felt the least bad option was to pay up, the bad news was that WannaCry wasn’t even an ‘honest virus’; a number of people paid and still didn’t get their data back! Community pharmacies don’t appear to have been infected by the WannaCry virus.…