My Experience: Mary Seacole Leadership Programme

Nick Kaye recalls his recent experience of undertaking the Mary Seacole programme.

When I first considered the Mary Seacole development programme, I was particularly interested in learning more about leadership. I am privileged to hold various leadership roles and was curious to know how the programme would improve my skills and add value to these roles. However, I also felt nervous about being away from the pharmacy in order to carry out the programme- and would investing my time be worth it? I decided to take the plunge. The first session was in Taunton, in a lovely but imposing town hall. I was intrigued about who I was about to meet and what I would learn about myself during the duration of the course. The first thing that struck me was the diversity of 30 or so of us in the group. We had Chief Officers of LPCs, an ex-Regional Director of Boots, an NPA Board Member, Pharmacists that have dual roles across GP practices, a newly qualified Pharmacist that had been the Chemist & Druggist highly commended Pre-reg. of the year only 12 months ago, and various Pharmacy Technicians. One of whom was new in post in a Manager role, and one that had been a Manager of the same pharmacy for many years.…

Core Belief: Community pharmacists are clinicians

‘A solution to primary care access, pressure lies in liberating the clinical potential of all pharmacists, especially those available without an appointment, in community pharmacies right across the country.’

Nick Kaye is the Superintendent Pharmacist of S.Kaye & Son Ltd in Newquay, Cornwall. The pharmacy has won several awards including, C&D Finalist 2013 and Pharmacy Business Award winner Entrepreneur 2012. Nick is an NPA national media spokesperson and was elected to the NPA Board in 2014 to represent the South West.  Today, Health Education England is holding a symposium entitled Clinical Pharmacists in General Practice. NHS managers, government officials, politicians and we ourselves as pharmacists must be wary of using language that draws a false distinction between with pharmacists operating from GP surgeries and pharmacists serving patients in local pharmacies. The language of ‘clinical pharmacists in general practice’ implies that community pharmacists do not have a clinical role. The NPA recently issued a statement of core beliefs, to be a unifying reference point for everything people say and do in the name of community pharmacy.  Amongst those beliefs is that ‘Community pharmacists are clinicians’. Here are some clinical interventions that have happened in community pharmacies recently (as reported by the NPA in Pharmacy Magazine).  I present them here not because they are unusual, but because they are in fact fairly typical of community pharmacy practice: An elderly female with a large weeping gash on one shin following a fall at home. …